Tag Archive | communication

How to Use a [BUSTED] Cell Phone to Meet 5 Basic Survival Needs | The Art of Manliness

A re-post from The Art of Manliness.com who in turn posted it as a guest (sponsored) post by Creek Stewart representing Dockers. Credit where credit’s due.

“Whether in a boat, on a plane, travelling through Africa, taking a road trip or Backpacking the Rockies, our cell phone has become a regular piece of Every Day Carry (EDC). I think it’s pretty safe to say that we will probably have our cell phone with us if ever faced with a tragic survival situation. It’s also not hard to imagine that it might not be working. Regardless of the reason, a broken or busted cell phone is STILL an amazing collection of pieces and parts that, with a little insight and creativity, can be used to help meet a surprising number of basic survival needs. How do I know this? I busted open a handful of cell phones to find out.” Creek Stewart.

For the full article and more from Art of Manliness follow the link below the image.

How to Use a [BUSTED] Cell Phone to Meet 5 Basic Survival Needs | The Art of Manliness.

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Copenhagen Consensus Challenge Paper on Natural Disasters Released.

The Copenhagen Consensus Centre has released a Challenge Paper on Natural Disasters, penned by Howard Kunreuther and Erwann Michel-Kerjan and distributed through CopenhagenConsensus.com

Summary. Downloadable PDF available below.

“In recent years, the world has experienced a series of truly devastating natural disasters that have taken many lives and triggered unprecedented economic losses. Hurricane Katrina in 2005 in the United States, the 2010 massive floods in Australia and the 2011 earthquake/tsunami in Japan, among other events, have demonstrated that even the most wealth and well prepared countries can experience large-scale damage and destruction when natural disasters strike.

The situation is much worse in low-income countries since they often do not have the financial means to protect their population and economy against catastrophes. In addition, building codes are lacking or not well enforced and the infrastructure is often poorly designed for disseminating information prior to a disaster, and assisting victims in a timely manner after its occurrence. The earthquake in Haiti in 2010 illustrates the challenges of an unprepared and poor country…

…First, the authors propose designing schools that can withstand earthquakes to reduce damage and the number of fatalities to children, teachers and other staff. Retrofitting the schools in all 35 most-exposed countries around the world would save the lives of 250,000 individuals over the next 50 years. Costs obviously vary from country to country: in the Solomon Islands it would cost just $36 million to retrofit schools while the cumulative total benefits are $235 million, yielding a benefit/cost ratio (BCR) greater than 6. In Afghanistan and Myanmar the costs would be $698 million and $1,570 million, respectively, with a benefit of about five times the amount invested.”

Read the full Summary and Download the Report (PDF) from the Copenhagen Consensus website.

 

Learning Survival Skills Should Involve Negotiation.

Brought to you by the San Francisco Chronicle (SFGate)

Learning survival skills is the only way to prepare oneself for the natural or man-made disasters plaguing the globe. Massive hurricanes or tsunamis, violent terrorist attacks, and economic meltdowns are real everyday threats to our society, today’s Absolute Rights.com article said. It’s no longer a matter of if. Instead, people are wondering when these catastrophes will happen.

That’s why Absolute Rights published “Bartering with Desperate People: Bartering and Negotiating in Post-Disaster Survival Situations,” its newest Special Report. The e-book explains how negotiating skills can help buy back livelihood after a crisis strikes.

Read more:

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/g/a/2012/04/13/prweb9397052.DTL#ixzz1rvkeA7jD

Emergency Communication Tips for Natural Disasters

Brought to you by KXII.com (US)

AT&T recognized by the department of homeland security offer these tips to help communicate after a storm. Program emergency numbers like the local police department ,fire station, and hospital into your phone.

Designate someone out of the area as a central contact so that all family members know who to contact if they become separated. Also keep your wireless phone dry water is the biggest threat during a tornado or hurricane, so keep your equipment safe with some type of waterproof protective covering.

Follow the below link for more communication tips.

Emergency Communication Tips for Natural Disasters.

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